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redsox2010

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I have been re-reading some of the older Bosch novels and I couldn't help but wondering again, why did everyone call Bosch's lieutenant (Harvey Pounds) "ninety-eight"?  Was this ever explained?  Was it a reference to/joke about his weight?

Betty

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Yes, it was a reference to a ninety-eight "pound" weakling.  It is an old joke.

la_vida_mocha

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Speaking of Harvey Pounds, I have a burning question ...

I understand why Harry had strong antipathy for his boss, but what actual event led to Harry assaulting him as referenced in 'The Last Coyote'?  That was the first Bosch book I read, so I returned to the beginning.  When I reached 'Concrete Blonde' I expected to see a tie-in, especially as Pounds had been his usual idiotic self in the early part of the book.

However the book closed without the show-down.  Does anyone know?  Perhaps there's a novella or short story in the works so we can vicariously enjoy Harry releasing his frustration.

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Harry talks about his assault on Harvey Pounds in "The Last Coyote" and he says he was mad that Harvey went into the interview room while he, Harry, was downstairs getting a cup of coffee. Harry wanted to talk to the witness but not reveal to him that he was a suspect. Harvey gave it away to the wit when he asked the witness if he had been read his Miranda rights.
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Annettet28

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The detectives escorted the man to the Hollywood Police Station as a witness intending to trip him up on details, but before they could begin, Lt. Harvey Pounds advised the man of his rights, causing him to request a lawyer and ruining the detectives' chance at finessing a confession. The man was subsequently released due to lack of evidence, and Bosch confronted Pounds. The two argued heatedly, until Bosch seized his commanding officer and threw the lieutenant face-first through a plate-glass window of his office.
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rtrd369

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Reply with quote  #6 
 In the second  series, Bosch pushed Lt. Pounds after Pounds put his hands on Harry near the end of their argument.

On another note, I'm re-reading The Black Ice and there are numerous mentions of Harry using his left hand to carry his weapon. The trialer for the 3rd season shows him holding it  and taking aim at a fleeing suv with his right hand after the driver of the suv tired to run him over.

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Janed

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Reply with quote  #7 
Bosch in the books is left handed. The actor playing Bosch in the show, Titus Welliver, uses both hands.

The story with Pounds going through the glass is different in the TV show. Read The Last Coyote for the original storyline.

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RogerDane

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Janed
Bosch in the books is left handed. The actor playing Bosch in the show, Titus Welliver, uses both hands.

The story with Pounds going through the glass is different in the TV show. Read The Last Coyote for the original storyline.


There are many differences but also subtle "melding" of book to film... Season 4 will be parts of "The Last Coyote" and how that will be done is the great anticipation.

The Pounds incident in the book was different in that Harry more or less instigated it by 'entering' the Lt''s office. In the TV series the "tall" Lt put his hands on Bosch and Bosch used what would be described as a martial arts swift unbalancing toss to put him thru the watch commander's office window. At the end of that you see Harry holding his hands in a 'ready' position. We are never really told of his "SpecOps" training (vs in the books he was a hands on tunnel rat, two tours, that was or is significant) but it is alluded to... anyway. Books and TV series are splendid.

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lagoondon

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Reply with quote  #9 
To elaborate a bit on the origin of Harvey Pounds' nickname, it refers to an early bodybuidling exponent named Charles Atlas who was big in the 50's and early 60's (see Wikipedia). He ran a mail order fitness company that his ads said would change you from a 98 lb. weakling into a muscle man. Most of Harry's colleagues in Hollywood Div. were old enough to remember Charles Atlas, and the nickname made a perfect fit for the highly unpopular Lt. Pounds
ronsmith100

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Reply with quote  #10 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lagoondon
To elaborate a bit on the origin of Harvey Pounds' nickname, it refers to an early bodybuidling exponent named Charles Atlas who was big in the 50's and early 60's (see Wikipedia). He ran a mail order fitness company that his ads said would change you from a 98 lb. weakling into a muscle man. Most of Harry's colleagues in Hollywood Div. were old enough to remember Charles Atlas, and the nickname made a perfect fit for the highly unpopular Lt. Pounds


I recall that Pounds was one of the hated "administrative" ladder climbers that had little or no street experience... a Peter Principle candidate if you will. He was hated equally be everyone but had a hard on for Bosch because in the TV series Harry didn't provide the deference he craved.
AndyO

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Reply with quote  #11 
Quote:
Originally Posted by la_vida_mocha
Speaking of Harvey Pounds, I have a burning question ...

I understand why Harry had strong antipathy for his boss, but what actual event led to Harry assaulting him as referenced in 'The Last Coyote'?  That was the first Bosch book I read, so I returned to the beginning.  When I reached 'Concrete Blonde' I expected to see a tie-in, especially as Pounds had been his usual idiotic self in the early part of the book.

However the book closed without the show-down.  Does anyone know?  Perhaps there's a novella or short story in the works so we can vicariously enjoy Harry releasing his frustration.


I could be wrong but I think the reason Bosch threw Pounds through the window was because he went in and advised a suspect of his rights before Harry was ready to.  I think the suspect was Edward Gunn who's story later appeared in A Darkness More than Night.
annegeerte_NL

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Reply with quote  #12 
This is correct.
ronsmith100

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Reply with quote  #13 
The 98 pound weakling was a cartoon ad for Charles Atlas body building program where a big guy kicks sand on the little 98 pound guy
here is a link to an old mag ad

https://masculinitysummit.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/atlas1.jpg
chris134711

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Reply with quote  #14 
Pounds seemed to be a poor excuse for a supervisor but his final end under some road tunnel with a blowtorch was a bit too harsh for me.  I know it was for Harry, too.  Mr. Connelly must have hated him deeply--but, maybe the author was just in a bad mood.  I have read many Bosch books and now I am reading them chronologically.  It helps to understand it all better. 
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